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and finally, they were adopted when the united nations declaration of human rights was put in force after world war ii. thanks in part to eleanor roosevelt who helped draft the declaration after her husband's death. virtually every industrialized nation has taken a step to industrialize these rights and have some kind of health coverage for their citizens with some major exceptions are you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. tell us what you think about this programming this weekend. you can tweet us at apple tv and comment and send us an e-mail. booktv, nonfiction books every weekend on c-span2. >> up next, "after words" with james hershberg and the international history project. we will have david coleman and his a list work, "the fourteenth day: jfk and the aftermath of the cuban missile crisis." he is the director of the miller center and he details the what happened on october 22, 1962. president kennedy walked a fine diplomatic line to remove weaponry from cuba. >> host: david, most of us are focused on those 13 days back in 1969. you are focusing on the aftermat
to bring it up in november at the united nations after the midterm election. he been broadcasting this through the summer. kennedy had been reading about this and reading the reports. they conditioned going to the crisis to believe that crew sheaf is going to force the issue. that's the issue that kennedy keeps coming back to cuba. if you ask kennedy what is crew sheaf up to. and kennedy was talking about this. kennedy would say west berlin. he would not say defense of cuba. the defense of cuba angle doesn't come through a lot for the american. not really thinking this through. it doesn't make sense to them. it doesn't sound like the way you defend cuba. the way from the american perspective in 1962 to do a mutual treaty or send lots of cop vengessal weapons which is what they were doing. but not send long range missile to threaten the united states. it's funny khrushchev accept the tactical battle field weapon. i think kennedy would have had a harder time convincing the world they were offensive weapon. >> guest: exactly. the flip side of that is that that kind of deterrence angl
want to think how random they can get he realizes the seating arrangement at the republican national committee is going to play a crucial role in determining the nomination for the republicans and the next president of the united states. >> host: okay we will be back after a brief break. >> host: we left ourselves at the chicago convention and 1860's and we are talking about lincoln as an extreme leader as an unfiltered leader coming out of left field and you set the scene on his obscurity but he has some advantages so tell us what effect this has as the convention plays out. >> guest: his team is able to recruit supporters of cross illinois and the way they recruit them is their testing them on how weld their voices are and they bring them into chicago on discounted tickets since he was a real return he could arrange that and the print fake tickets for the convention and a stack the rafters with these lincoln supporters so every time his name is mentioned the supporters start yelling and screaming and shouting their support so much that the windows of the hall at cliche in response
, that the united states had the responsibility to protect the independence of nations from communistic russia. this may south vietnam. now, kennedy had raised troop levels. i won't go into all the things that truman and eisenhower did, but right alone, we are very heavily involved in protect and south vietnam and johnston believed that these prior commitments committed him. he also is a strong cold war era. he is to comment on how the young people protesting simply didn't understand communism because they'd never grown up or had to fight world war ii. they didn't know what appeasement meant in munich, you know, chamberlain forth. the united states must keep its commitments. it was johnson's great misfortune when you either had to fish. kennedy didn't have to do it. >> host: you are referring of course to the nominal theory. >> guest: is a very good cold warrior, but i never bought the domino theory. because this has always made every disappeared histories that this is america thinking that you put up a solid wall. not just united front, the sheer method is just no opposition on these issues a
is the negotiator. he gives part of the treaty and then he comes back to united states and the senate has to ratify it. their 96 centers at the time in 80 of them have said that they want the united states to ratify the treaty and join the league of nations under some conditions. 80 is well more than enough to make the ratification. >> host: they need two-thirds. >> guest: two-thirds, yes. ratification is not hard. you need 64 or 65. the problem is the senate republicans led by henry cabot lodge who wilson had known for many decades, they don't want to give wilson a try and. some of them are opposed to joining the treaty and they have reservations about the sovereignty. many of them are willing to join the treaty with a condition. these reservations are not huge. the british for example will eventually say they have no problem with the treaty. it's not an obstacle for them. >> host: they are not deal breakers. >> guest: they shouldn't be deal breakers. very few people view them as deal breakers. henry cabot lodge knows wilson and lodge says wilson, you know he might have reservations on the princip
solution to the problem. so i think with so many he could have united the people of good will to address this problem and that polarized the nation and was the beginning of polarization that would never end until a civil war. >> if we could bring john quincy adams to the day, what do you think he would like and not like america in 2012? >> he would despise our involvement overseas. our attempt to dictate to society's the kind of society as they have to have. when he had the opportunity as the secretary of state to intervene, monroe would have done whatever he could in the pro-democracy movement so to speak he pointed out that these people have no history of self-government. religiously or politically they had never been exposed to self-government. their political culture and family culture did not tolerate. he said this is a lost cause we must not involve ourselves and said he would not involve us in trying to change the culture of the people in the middle east. these are people with no history, no political history or religious history of self governance. they don't know what it means.
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6